Learning From Feedback, or Why you should grow a tougher skin

Getting feedback on your work.

Recently I had a post on The Write Conversation about getting feedback as a writer. Hearing criticism is rarely fun, even when the person is correct and the feedback is helpful. It’s hard to look past the slap in the face.

But we learn by receiving criticism, especially good criticism from people who know what they are talking about. In my post I gave four places to go to get feedback on your writing.

You can read the post here.

If you find this helpful, or have anything to add, please leave me a comment. And as always, thanks for reading.

Fight Cyberbullying With Positive Words – Advice from Lori Hatcher

Man writing blog post.

Before I direct you to a great post by Lori Hatcher about the power of positive words, I want to tell you about some thoughts I have for the direction of this blog.

As you can see from my recent posts, I’ve gotten negligent in my posting. When I think about it, the reason is simple, I’ve lost my focus.

I know many other bloggers run into this. I’ve had this blog going since 2013. The ideas I started with have run out, and my life and  many of my goals have changed. When I started, the purpose of this blog was to help people find jobs and grow in their careers. Although that’s important, it’s no longer my priority.

But not only did my focus change, I was trying to write as the mood hit. It’s hard to continue when you don’t have a goal, a destination.

So, for the next little while, I’m concentrating on a few topics I find important: Continue reading “Fight Cyberbullying With Positive Words – Advice from Lori Hatcher”

Finding Your Writing Process

I was fortunate to be able to attend the Novelist Retreat that Yvonne Lehman puts on

Ridgecrest conference Center
Ridgecrest Center

at Ridgecrest near Ashville, NC. It was a time of getting to meet other authors and offer workshops for writers to learn more of the craft of writing.

 

 

One of the most important lessons to learn is that there is no one way to write. You have to learn, by experience, what works best for you,.

This was evidenced by the writers selected to be our faculty. In this corner (read in the voice of the WWE announcer) was Steven James. Steven is an organic writer, which means he writes without an outline. He lets the story guide him. Sometimes into a corner, without a way out. But, he says, that is often when we have to be our most creative. (His book, Story Trumps Structure is a great resource and teacher of this method.)

And in this corner. . . Torry Martin and Diann Mills showed how structure gives you a start and format for your book or story. A simple way to look at this is the three-act structure with a beginning, a middle, and an end.

So, who’s right? Continue reading “Finding Your Writing Process”