Writing Is A Journey or reasons why I write

Writing a story.

This month in my post at The Write Conversation, I looked back at the last six years of my writing journey. Attending writing conferences has been a way for me to learn the craft and business of writing, as well as to become a part of the writing community.

Any new career requires a time of acclimation and learning the job. It often requires both practice and training.

On The Write Conversation, I give four reasons why I attend certain conferences each year. (Click here for the post.)

All this begs the question, why do I want to write in the first place? I mean, it’s hard. There are so many things to learn and master.

And it takes time. I spoke to an agent last week and they said that we have time to pick the right project to send out and that we are lucky that we have time.

I wanted to say, “No we don’t. I want my book on the shelf and on the best sellers list (which, of course, it will be on) now.”

But that’s not the way it works, is it?

Is it worth it?

I have a message and I want to share it. I have characters in my head who I would like the world to meet. And, I have a worldview, one of hope and a loving Heavenly Father, that readers need to hear either for the first time or to reinforce what they know but the world tramples down.

Writing is a journey and we can’t see where it will eventually take us. Sometimes we, I, have to trust.

Isn’t that why I’m doing this anyway?

I wish you the best in trying to reach your dream. I, also, want to thank you for visiting my blog. If you have a comment, please leave it below, or hit me up on Facebook or Twitter.

Agatha Christie: Five Decades of Mysteries


Agatha Christie's creation
Hercule Poirot

To me, Agatha Christie was the Master of Mysteries. I know Poe came first. But his stories were more puzzles. He didn’t focus on mysteries like Agatha, or rather, the Grand Dame, did. Dr. Conan Doyle, with Sherlock, brought us the great detective story. But Agatha gave us three major detectives or couples, including Hercule Poirot, Miss Marple, and the ones I loved, Tommy and Tuppence. She brought the mysteries into our homes. At least the homes in England. And her detectives

Recently my sweet wife brought home a book that I think is a treasure. Agatha Christie: Murder in the Making by John Curran. Continue reading “Agatha Christie: Five Decades of Mysteries”

Learning From Feedback, or Why you should grow a tougher skin


Getting feedback on your work.

Recently I had a post on The Write Conversation about getting feedback as a writer. Hearing criticism is rarely fun, even when the person is correct and the feedback is helpful. It’s hard to look past the slap in the face.

But we learn by receiving criticism, especially good criticism from people who know what they are talking about. In my post I gave four places to go to get feedback on your writing.

You can read the post here.

If you find this helpful, or have anything to add, please leave me a comment. And as always, thanks for reading.